My Time

Address: 172 All Saints House, Herbert Road, Small Heath, Birmingham, B10 0PR

Tel: 0121 7666699

Website: www.richmondfellowship.org.uk/my-time

My-Time-logo

My Time is an award-winning, pioneering and innovative service user led multi-lingual community mental health service provider working in the Midlands and the Isle of Wight.

In 12 years it has developed community based solutions to increasing levels of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem and long-term mental health issues. In December 2015 it became a fully integrated division of Richmond Fellowship.

Its key services include:

Diverse psychological therapies and innovation – My Time is the principal provider of counselling and IAPT in community languages in Birmingham and works in 25 GP surgeries. Its bespoke clinical team is able to work across the mental health spectrum from psychological assessments to design of preventative products.

Family mental health services – Since 2008, My Time has been developing and delivering a psychological intervention model (FACT – Family Action for Choice Tomorrow) that tackles the dual issue of mental health and domestic violence that puts children at risk. FACT involves holistic delivery different interventions including case management, family therapy, domestic violence perpetrator programmes, domestic violence counselling, family group conferencing, and family support.

Community and peer led services – My Time has developed a traditional supporting people team into a core staff of multi-lingual mental health development workers that support individuals and families with long-term mental health issues to live independently. Service user leadership is at the core of its work and there is a range of peer led activities and programmes.

Research – My Time has built up a research team in partnership with Aston University that is able to measure social impact, deliver community participatory action research studies and design new approaches. It has published 12 community participation research studies over the last 11 years which have fed into local, regional, national and international policy making processes including emotional needs of asylum seekers, carers, young people and the issue of men and suicide.